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Winfield P. Niblo

Photographs of Winfield P. Niblo, widely credited with bringing American square dance to Japan after World War II. In one photo he can be seen calling with cupped hands; there simply was no PA system available to use.

Woman in Love - Red Bates, 1961

The singing call, Woman In Love, is a classic and Red uses the figure as it was recorded by Dick Leger on Grenn record #12128. Tempo is a characteristic of calling that underwent considerable change. This singing call was at 132 beats per minute (bpm), the fastest of any in this set of clips by Red Bates but a very common pace for MWSD at that…

Women Callers - article

Article presumably written by Bob Osgood, describing the challenges and opportunities for women square dance callers

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Workshop at Record Square

View full record for details.

Wrong Way Thar - Bob Dalsemer

Bob Dalsemer calls this figure, which he adapted from Milly Riley's self-published book Western Square Dancing based on Dorothy Shaw's syllabi of the Lloyd Shaw Dance Fellowship, 1955-1970. The original dance (p. 154) is entitled "Arky Stuff." It features both a regular Allemande Thar figure and "wrong way" Thar. This clip includes a walkthrough.

Your Home Town - Fenton "Jonesy" Jones

A rare live recording of Jonesy calling, this time a singing square.

Youth in Square Dancing

This is a thorough look at how to involve younger dancers in square dancing, prepared by Sets in Order and published in the 1960s.

The handbook opens with an essay by Ralph and Zora Piper on "The Child's Nature and Square Dancing." Among other topics discussed are:
• A Bit About the Teacher
• Finding a Good Place to Dance
• Tips on…

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Yucaipa Roll Away - Carroll White

The dance was created by Ed Gilmore, who ran a hardware store in Yucaipa, CA, when he started his calling career. The dance was published in 1950 in Square Dancing: The Newer and Advanced Dances, by Bob Osgood and Jack Hoheisel. The dance spread from there, and the basic calls can be found in Al Brundage's little black book of square dance calls on…